On Winemaking, Pinot Noir and our 2017 Vintage

adminVineyard, Wine making, Wine Tasting

Dan Duryee, winemaker, stands amongst oak barrels at Lady Hill Winery tasting room in Saint Paul, Oregon.
Portrait of Dan Duryee, winemaker at Lady Hill Winery

Dan Duryee, winemaker, stands among oak barrels at Lady Hill Winery tasting room in Saint Paul, Oregon

 

Technical progress makes it possible to always improve the quality of the wines, but it seems that this very technicality leads to a standardization of the product. With filtration and the imperatives of competition, it becomes difficult to say whether a Chardonnay wine has been made in France, Italy or California.

The professionals want drinks that are acceptable to everyone, so there is no longer room for the personality and originality of the scent – just as it does for whiskey, gin or vodka. Now, what makes a wine interesting is its individuality, and it is its unique aromas and taste that make it fascinating. The preservation of this character is therefore an absolute necessity, even if we must meet certain difficulties with some of the consumers accustomed to the so-called “international” style.

/…/

Since the beginning of my critical career, I have been fighting against excessive manipulation. If we study the methods of the best producers, we can draw up the following list:

1. Willingness to preserve the personality of the vineyard, the specificities of the grape variety and the character of the vintage.
2. Low returns.
3. Harvesting when the physiological maturity of the grapes is reached (except when the weather is at its peak).
4. Very simple winemaking and aging techniques, and minimal interventions: the wine is on its own.
5. Refusal to deplete or emasculate a naturally stable wine, made from healthy and mature grapes, by clarification and excessive filtration (these processes are obviously justified for unstable wines).

– Robert Parker, Guide to French Wine

Interview with winemaker Dan Duryee at Lady Hill Winery, Saint Paul, Oregon

I sat down today for an hour long conversation with our Winemaker, Dan Duryee on the subject of winemaking, Pinot Noir and the 2017 vintage of Three Feathers Pinot Noir.

Dan is a Kansas City native. He got a degree in Molecular Biology from the University of Colorado. He has been the winemaker at Lady Hill Winery since 2016 and before that he was eleven vintages (years) at Cana’s Feast in Carlton, Or.  Dan has experience in winemaking with all the area’s Varietals from both sides of the Cascade Mountains.

We began our discussion referencing the quotes from the noted Wine Authority Robert Parker who, incidentally, is part owner in Beaux Frères Wine, an award winning vineyard only a few miles from Three Feathers Vineyard on the south side of Chehalem Mountain in the Ribbon Ridge AVA.

Dan agreed with Mr. Parker’s philosophy of minimal manipulation and allowing the wine to reflect not only the vine, the region and the soil but also the ups and downs of the climate from one season to another. In his opinion, the Pinot Noir grape produces an elegant wine that can easily be overpowered by over manipulation, blending or too much oak.  Properly made, the flavor should strongly reflect the region and ground on which it was grown. The color is generally light and the flavor should be consistently even from start to finish.

The Pinot Noir grape generally produces a dryer, more acidic Red Wine. There is a tendency to want Pinot Noir to be a bigger, sweeter, more intense color and flavor and that desire leads some to pick later with more sugars and therefore more alcohol.

Dan brought samples from the 2017 barrels made in September. The wine had just finished the second, or malolactic, fermentation. At this point sulfur is added to protect the wine from any degeneration so this was not really the ideal point to sample the wine. However we were able to make several comparisons with the 2016 Pinot Noir that we brought along. The color of the wine made in 2017 was still a deep fuchsia pink whereas 2016 had become more of a brick red with a very slight orange tint. Dan remarked that the brick color was characteristic of Chehalem Mountain wines reflecting the Laurelwood Soils.

The 2017 wine had not yet developed the full berry aroma of the 2016 Pinot because the sulfur tends to mask that, but he did note some oncoming floral and mineral aromas coming from the roots as the aging vines reach new depths and acquire the flavors and scents from the soil.

A major difference in the two wines is the Yeast used. In 2016, Dan used a yeast called Assmanshausen which is a slow acting yeast that ferments at a cool temperature. It is usually used for White wine. The yeast used this year was RP15, also called “rock pile yeast”. This yeast heats the wine more, extracts more color from the skins and enhances and intensifies the flavor. As we continue to sample the barrel it will be interesting to see what difference these two yeast make in the final product.

Decked halls for the 2017 Holiday Season at Lady Hill Winery

Decked halls for the 2017 Holiday Season at the tasting room of Lady Hill Winery in Saint Paul, Oregon.

2017 Grape Harvest

adminGrowing, Vineyard

Rows of Grape Vines in Rolling Hills of Three Feathers Vineyard, Chehalem Mountain, Oregon, Morning Light in Fall Season
Rows of Grape Vines in Rolling Hills on Three Feathers Vineyard, Morning Light in Fall Season

Rows of Grape Vines in Rolling Hills, Morning Light in Fall Season

Three Feathers Estate 2017 Grape Harvest

The year in the vineyard has come to a close.  The grapes are picked, sorted, de-stemmed and nestled in their vats at Lady Hill Winery where they are on the road to becoming the 2017 Vintage Three Feathers Pinot Noir.

It has been a year of difficult decisions and challenges, but in many ways a perfect season for growing.  Early in 2017 we decided that our 3 year old blocks needed to be pruned back to delay their fruiting until they were more mature.  The 4 year old block was reduced to unilateral vines to limit production and increase the quality of the fruit.  This meant less fruit, but the result was earlier ripening and less work thinning.

The season started cool and two weeks later than 2016, but from early June until the end of September there was little rain and slightly higher temperatures with occasional spikes of hot weather.  The vines were tended weekly to prevent disease, train growth and give proper nutrients and water.

The result of all this work culminated October 3rd.  Brix were measured at 23.4, acid at 3.23 and it was time to pick!  A small team of workers assembled by our staff gathered at 7:30 am in the mist.  It was a perfect Full Moon day.  Warm and clear.

Worker harvesting grapes at Three Feathers Vineyard, Chehalem Mo

Becca harvesting grapes at Three Feathers Vineyard, Chehalem Mountain, Oregon

As the day went on and temperatures rose, premium grapes were picked into IKEA laundry baskets and dumped into winery bins.

It was clear as the fruit came off the vines and into the bins that all of our work throughout the year had paid off and we had a beautiful crop of Pinot noir grapes.

Good work 3F Crew!
Home Team: Christine, Victor, David and Scott
Visiting Team: Elise, François, Colin, Oscar and Felix
Pinch hitters (pickers): Becca, Mike, Tallon, Jerico, Austin and Damon

Fall colors over Three Feathers Vineyard in Chehalem Mountain, W

Fall colors over Three Feathers Vineyard in Chehalem Mountain, Willamette Valley, Oregon

Homemade Vanilla Ice Cream with Blackberry Pinot Noir Sauce

adminFarm Life, Pairing, Recipes

Recipe for Homemade Vanilla Ice Cream with Blackberry Pinot Noir Sauce from Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard.
Homemade Vanilla Ice Cream with Blackberry Pinot Noir Sauce

What could be more quintessentially Oregon than Pinot Noir and Blackberries?  Three Feathers Estate was once home to a blackberry farm and the land is still covered with wild blackberries in abundance.  I came up with this sauce when I was testing our 2017 grapes for ripeness and could not bear to just throw them away or give them to the chickens!

Blackberry Pinot Noir Sauce

Ingredients
2 cups of grapes, destemmed
2 cups fresh blackberries
2 cups sugar ( or 1 cup of sugar for each cup of juice)

Preparation
Cook blackberries and grapes over low heat, crushing fruit to render its juices.  Strain in a fine meshed wire sieve.  Add the sugar and stir to dissolve.  Cook until it is slightly thickened.  Let cool.
If cooked a little longer the mixture will set and become jelly.  Also very good, but takes patience and skill not to burn or overcook.

Recipe for Homemade Vanilla Ice Cream with Blackberry Pinot Noir sauce

Homemade Vanilla Ice Cream with Blackberry Pinot Noir sauce

Homemade Vanilla Ice Cream

Ingredients

One dozen handpicked farm fresh organic eggs of different colors

Eighteen handpicked farm fresh organic eggs of different colors.

1.5 cups of whole milk
3/4 cup sugar
1/8 tsp salt
2 egg yolks
2 cups heavy cream
1 tsp vanilla

Preparation
Heat the milk, sugar and salt together until the sugar is dissolved.  Add the egg yolks, stir thoroughly, and heat slowly over low heat until the custard is thickened and coats a wooden spoon.  Set to cool.  Mix in the heavy cream and vanilla.  Put into an ice cream maker and churn.  When done freeze for several hours before serving.

Store bought ice cream would be wonderful as well but with our own eggs it was a perfect way to fill the demand for vanilla ice cream at a lower cost.

Serve ice cream with sauce and a few blackberries.

Christine Roosevelt Stimac holding an Araucana chicken on her fa

Christine Stimac holds a Buff Orpington chicken on her farm.

Smuggled!

adminGrowing, Travel Stories, Wine making, Wine Tasting

Three Feathers Pinot Noir first vintage visits the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France.

Smuggled!

My adventure began on Saturday August 12 when I and my eleven case companions were taken from our distinguished labeled carton and stuffed into smelly suitcases full of human laundry.  What was happening? Were we being bottle-napped?

After some bouncing and jostling and many hours of silence I felt a strange sensation of lightness, very cold and noisy. I couldn’t breathe and if I’d had a cork I would have popped it. After many interminable hours in this condition we finally were released from the cases.  We were lovingly examined for damage; nothing except for a definite gurgling inside.

First vintage 2016Three Feathers Pinot Noir intrigues passers-by in front of art gallery Studio Galerie B&B in Paris, France.

First vintage 2016 Three Feathers Pinot Noir intrigues passers-by in front of Studio Galerie B&B in Paris, France.

The next thing I knew, we were in a wine cellar alongside many other bottles.  But much to our surprise all of them were speaking a weird foreign language. Fortunately as a result of the American roots of most of the vines the grapes came from we finally managed to communicate: we were in Paris, France. Voila!! It all became clear.  We were here to show what Americans could do with Pinot Noir!

Bottles of 2016 Three Feathers Pinot Noir lying side by side with French bottles in a wine cave in Paris, France.

Bottles of 2016 Three Feathers Pinot Noir lying side by side with French bottles in a wine cave in Paris, France.

Our reception was not very Friendly.  The other wines tried to tell us how superior they were. They came from ancient Vineyards and famous regions. They were skeptical of our family crest, taunting that it was not in the Book of Heraldry and probably contrived.  Who ever heard of the State of Oregon?  But when I mentioned that we are neighbors of California then there was a hush and some of them were visibly shaken.

We finally made it clear that, despite their heritage, we were still their cousins.  Deep down our roots are all the same Pinot Noir!

Pre-harvest ripening clusters of Pinot Noir clone 667 on vines a

Pre-harvest ripening clusters of Pinot Noir clone 667 on vines at Three Feathers Estate.

Cynthia’s Spring Rolls

adminPairing, Recipes

Cynthia's spring rolls served with Three Feathers Estate 2016 Pinot Noir with view of vineyards in background.
Cynthia's spring rolls served with Three Feathers Estate 2016 Pinot Noir with view of vineyards in background.

Cynthia’s spring rolls served with Three Feathers Estate 2016 Pinot Noir with view of vineyards in background.

Cynthia has elaborated this variation of spring rolls from a recipe that a Vietnamese friend taught her to make many years ago.  Perfect for a buffet, light lunch or hot summer evening meal, these spring rolls are delicious served a watercress, fennel and baby greens salad and a bottle of our first vintage 2016 Three Feathers Pinot Noir.

This recipe serves 9 and makes 75 large rolls that can be frozen before cooking.  The shiitake and ginger give these rolls a special punch of flavor that marries well with the fruity aroma of our pinot noir.

Cynthia’s Spring Rolls, Step-by-Step

Ingredients

Stuffing
1 pound shelled shrimp
4 pounds ground pork
4 cloves crushed garlic
1/3 cup minced cilantro
8 chopped scallions, including half of the greens
1/4 cup grated fresh ginger
100 grams chopped fresh baby shiitake
1/2 cup grated carrots
150 grams vermicelli

Wrappers
75 spring roll wrappers
3 eggs, lightly beaten

Preparation

Place the vermicelli noodles in a bowl and pour boiling water on them.  Let sit for 5 minutes.  Drain, rinse well with cold water and let them sit until cool.

In the meantime, chop, mince and prepare the ingredients for the spring roll filling as specified above. Cynthia prefers to use a peeler to shave the carrots into long paper thin strips, however they can also be grated. Place all of the stuffing ingredients into a large bowl and add the vermicelli. Use your hands to mix the ingredients together thoroughly.

Preparation of spring roll wrappers for Cynthia's spring rolls

Preparation of spring roll wrappers for Cynthia’s spring rolls

Spread one clean kitchen towel on the counter top and cover the towel with a moist paper towel. Open the spring roll wrappers and place them in a stack on top of the moist paper towel. Cover the stack with second moist paper towel and place a second clean kitchen towel over the whole. The humidity will prevent the wrappers from drying out while you are making the spring rolls.

Set up a work station with the moist spring roll wrappers, the bowl of eggs and basting brush, a cutting board surface for wrapping and a receiving tray for the finished rolls.

Place one spring roll wrapper on a diagonal on the cutting board as shown above and place a spoonful of stuffing at the bottom corner. Baste the lowest tip with some beaten egg and fold the wrapper over the stuffing, roll once, then fold in the two side corners. Baste the upper tip of the wrapper and complete the roll so that the basted egg catches and holds the roll in place.

Cooking

Heat a large pot, half-filled with peanut oil, to a rolling boil.  Place the spring rolls in the boiling oil one at a time avoiding contact with each other.  When they float to the surface and are slightly browned, they are cooked.

Freezing, reheating

These spring rolls can be prepared ahead of time and frozen raw, to be cooked at a later date. Once cooked, they are also delicious reheated in the oven.

Lines on the Vines

adminGrowing, Vineyard

Vines and tendrils reaching upwards on their trellis wires on Th
Vines and tendrils reaching upwards on their trellis wires on Th

Vines and tendrils reaching upwards on their trellis wires on Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard.

2017 Vineyard Season Update

We have been frantically busy since our last post about the vineyard at bud break in May.  I analogize the season in the vineyard to a horse race with us in a race to keep up with the pace of the vines as they grow.  There’s weeding and mowing, fertilizing and disease control and the perpetual attempt to keep the plants under control with trellis wires, clips and pruners.

Vines as far as the eye can see at Three Feathers Estate & Viney

Vines as far as the eye can see at Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard.

Vineyard team tying up Pinot Gris plants to promote strength on

Vineyard team tying up Pinot Gris plants to promote strength on Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard.

Vineyard team member wearing the indispensable straw hat tying up Pinot

Vineyard team member wearing the indispensable straw hat.

Overview of vine rows on Three Feathers Vineyard.

Overview of vine rows on Three Feathers Vineyard.

Early on, the vines look so neat and tidy with growing shoots and flowering inflorescence; then, suddenly, they burst into growth with reaching tendrils that entangle each other, the tractors and anything they can grab on to.

Pre-bloom on Pinot Noir vines at Three Feathers Estate & Vineyar

Pre-bloom on Pinot Noir vines at Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard.

Blooming inflorescence on Pinot Noir vines at Three Feathers E

Blooming inflorescence on Pinot Noir vines at Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard.

Inflorescence, or bloom, on Pinot Noir vines at Three Feathers E

Blooming inflorescence on Pinot Noir vines at Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard.

The green pea-size fruit is now taking shape in clusters.  We have had beautiful weather; cool windy nights and hot dry days.  So far, we are anticipating a normal harvest date in early October, with bountiful and intense-flavored fruit.  We shall see.

Pea-size Pinot Noir grape clusters on Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard

Pea-size Pinot Noir grape clusters on Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard.

Pea-size Pinot Noir grape clusters on Three Feathers Estate & Vi

Pea-size Pinot Noir grape clusters on Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard.

Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard celebrates a glorious Oregon summer with a family photo session

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Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard owners Elise Prudhomme, Cynthia Sciarratta and Christine Stimac
Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard owners Elise Prudhomme, Cynthia Stimac and Christine Stimac

Christine Stimac (right) and daughers Elise Prudhomme (left) and Cynthia Stimac (middle) owners of Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard, Chehalem Mountain, Oregon.

Photo Session at Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard

We are having glorious weather in the vineyards in Hillsboro, Oregon. Time for our family to enjoy the best that Oregon has to offer and an excellent opportunity for a photo shoot.

Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard owners Christine Stimac (left) and daughters Cynthia Stimac (middle) and Elise Prudhomme (right) pose in the formal garden of their property on Chehalem Mountain.

Elise Prudhomme, Cynthia Stimac and Christine Stimac are own
Elise Prudhomme, Cynthia Stimac and Christine Stimac are own

We just bottled our 2016 Pinot Noir!

adminWine making

Pinot noir bottles at Three Feathers Vineyards' Chehalem Mountains in Willamette Valley Oregon.
Pinot noir bottles at Three Feathers Vineyards' Chehalem Mountains in Willamette Valley Oregon.

Pinot noir bottles at Three Feathers Vineyards’ Chehalem Mountains in Willamette Valley Oregon.

From Barrels to Bottles

We are excited to announce that we just bottled our first vintage Three Feathers 2016 Pinot Noir!  Bottles and cases can be purchased exclusively at Three Feathers Market.

It was a celebration “en famille” when Elise and her family visiting from France gathered with Christine at Lady Hill Winery to witness the bottling of our first Pinot Noir vintage 2016.  In the capable hands of Signature Bottlers, orchestrated by our winemaker Dan Duryee, the juice from Three Feathers grapes flowed from barrels to bottles in a parade of machinery on the assembly line-up.

Colin Prudhomme in the barrel storage room of Lady Hill Winery d

Colin Prudhomme admiring the barrel storage room of Lady Hill Winery during the bottling of our 2016 vintage Three Feathers Pinot Noir.

Dan Duryee, our winemaker at Lady Hill, holds up the screw cap b

Dan Duryee, our winemaker at Lady Hill, holds up the screw cap bottle being used for our 2016 vintage Three Feathers Pinot Noir.

Three Feathers bottles enter the bottling process on the Signatu

Three Feathers bottles enter the bottling process on the Signature Bottlers line-up.

Three Feather bottles enter the StelvinLux screwcapping machine

Three Feather bottles enter the StelvinLux screwcapping machine on the assembly line-up by Signature Bottlers.

Two assembly workers add the screw caps to Three Feather bottles

Two assembly workers add the screw caps to Three Feather bottles before they enter the StelvinLux screwcapping machine.

The labels for our Three Feathers 2016 vintage Pinot Noir ready

The labels for our Three Feathers 2016 vintage Pinot Noir ready to adhere to bottles in the Signature Bottlers assembly line-up.

Christine Stimac, Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard partner, watc

Christine Stimac, Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard partner, watches the bottling process by Signature Bottlers at Lady Hill Winery.

Final Three Feathers 2016 vintage Pinot Noir bottled and ready f

Final Three Feathers 2016 vintage Pinot Noir bottled and ready for packaging.

Packaged cartons of Three Feathers wine exit the Signature Bottl

Packaged cartons of Three Feathers wine exit the Signature Bottlers truck at full speed and roll on down for labeling and delivery.

Packaging and labeling Three Feathers wine cartons at Lady Hill

Packaging and labeling Three Feathers wine cartons at Lady Hill Winery.

Victor’s Infallible Smoked Turkey Weber-style

adminPairing, Recipes

Carving a Smoked Turkey cooked on a Weber Kettle barbecue served with our 2016 vintage Three Feathers Pinot Noir.
Carving a Smoked Turkey cooked on a Weber Kettle barbecue served with our 2016 vintage Three Feathers Pinot Noir.

Carving a Smoked Turkey cooked on a Weber Kettle barbecue to be served with our 2016 vintage Three Feathers Pinot Noir.

Three Feathers Vineyard vintage 2016 Pinot Noir for a summer evening dinner party

Three Feathers Vineyard vintage 2016 Pinot Noir for a summer evening dinner party

Victor’s Infallible Smoked Turkey Weber-style

Friends from out-of-town came to dinner.  After a long week of hot weather spent tending the vines, we wanted to serve them something perfect from the barbecue and decided that a good wholesome smoked turkey would fit the bill.  After all, who says that turkey is only reserved for the holidays?

Our wine of choice?  A nice bottle of 2016 Three Feathers Pinot Noir, of course.

If you want to impress your guests with a recipe that always pleases, and you have a Weber grill handy, try this recipe:

Materials
1 Weber Kettle grill
1 bag of good quality charcoal (we use Kingsford)
1 aluminum pan to catch turkey juices

Ingredients
1 fresh turkey with pop-up thermometer (if the turkey is frozen, defrost completely)
Salt and cracked pepper

Cooking time
Average 2 1/2 – 3 hours for a 10-13 lb turkey
Or use a temperature gauge for other sizes

Preparation
Lightly season the turkey with salt and pepper.  Do not grease with butter or olive oil.
Make sure that the wings and thighs are tied back and not loose.

Prepare the first coals as follows:
Position a barbecue chimney into the Weber grill and add 54 charcoal briquettes.
When flames begin to shoot out of the chimney (do not overcook the coals), turn out the coals into the lower grate and separate them in equal portions of 27 briquettes on either side.
Place the aluminum drip pan in the middle of the lower grate and add 1/2 a cup of water to it.
Insert the upper grate and ensure that the grate doors are positioned exactly over the coals.
Position the turkey on the upper grate directly over the aluminum drip pan.
Place the hood on the Weber and ensure that the upper and lower vents are open.

Add new coals as follows:
Every hour, precisely to the minute, open the upper grate doors and add 9 charcoal briquettes to each side on top of the existing 27 briquettes.
Close the grill hood and avoid opening it back up so that the heat is contained for the smoking process.
The turkey is cooked when the thermometer pops up (or your thermometer registers the correct temperature). It should be tender and juicy and not overly smoked with a dark brown skin.
Remove the turkey from the grill and let it sit for 10-15 minutes covered in aluminum foil before carving.

We recommend our 2016 Three Feathers Pinot Noir with this recipe for its fruity aroma and light acidity.

Et voilà! Bon appétit.

Smoked Turkey cooked on a Weber Kettle barbecue by Victor Stimac at Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard

Smoked Turkey cooked on a Weber Kettle barbecue by T. Victor Stimac at Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard

Hay Harvesting on Three Feathers Estate

adminFamily, Farm Life, Hay making

Haymaking Team of Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard
3FETHR plate on our 4x4 truck covered with hay during Three Feathers Estate 2017 harvest

Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard vanity plate covered in hay during the 2017 harvest.

Three Feathers Estate 2017 Hay Harvest

The day the Prudhomme boys landed in Portland from France, Three Feathers hay was ready to harvest. We drove the French contingent right to Wilco to buy double-reinforced leather gloves and it was off to work.

John Deere and New Holland cross paths in the haying frenzy at Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard

Haymaking Team of Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard driving the venerable John Deere and our New Holland to make win-rows and pick up bales.

French haymaking team bringing bales to the barn on Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard

French haymaking team bringing bales to the barn on Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard during the 2017 hay harvest.

In three days, Big Blue and Baby Blue (our two New Holland tractors) cut and raked and win-rowed 1200 bales of fine quality fresh green mountain hay for our Oregon customers. We followed behind with our 4×4 truck and trailer, bucking and stacking the bales as fast as the tractors could make them.

Six men and one broken baler during Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard 2017 hay harvest.

Six men and one broken baler during Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard 2017 hay harvest.

Haymaking team evaluating the flat tire on the John Deere at Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard.

Haymaking team evaluating the flat tire on the John Deere at Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard.

The usual mishaps had to happen at the same time on the same day. Our old baler did not like the thicker richer parts of the field let us know it. Big Blue decided it needed more oil and put out a warning light and the huge wheel of our venerable John Deere got a flat.

Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard haymaking team taking a quick break in between bucking bales.

Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard haymaking team taking a quick break in between bucking bales.

New Holland Baler needs to be retuned during haymaking at Three

New Holland Baler needs to be retuned during haymaking at Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard.

“Well”, said Victor, “it’s the pleasures of farming! We are doing much better than last year.”

Haymaking Team of Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard

Haymaking Team of Three Feathers Estate & Vineyard poised on 50 tons of hay